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Latest Articles

What is ovarian cancer?
Cancer (breast, ovarian, etc.)
Ovarian cancer happens when cells that are not normal grow in one or both of your ovaries. The ovaries are two small glands, located on either side of your uterus. They produce female sex hormones and store and release eggs (ova). Treatments for ovarian cancer are more successful when the cancer is found early. But most of the time, cancer has already spread by the time it is found. This topic is about epithelial ovarian cancer. This is cancer that grows in the tissue covering the ovaries. It is the most common type of ovarian cancer and usually occurs in women who are past menopause. What causes ovarian cancer? Experts don't know exactly what causes ovarian cancer. But they do know that...
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Why should I care about high cholesterol?
Cholesterol
High cholesterol, also called hypercholesteremia, puts men at increased risk for heart attacks, strokes, and peripheral artery disease. For many men, the risk of high cholesterol starts in their 20s and increases with age. High cholesterol tends to run in families, so obviously genes play a role. But a variety of lifestyle factors also affect cholesterol levels -- including diet, activity level, and body weight. The only way to know how high your cholesterol levels are is to get a simple blood test. Everyone over 20 should get a cholesterol test at least once a year. If your numbers are high, your doctor may recommend the test more often. What is high cholesterol? Cholesterol, a fat-like ...
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6 Tips for Flat Abs
Abs (Core)
Two fitness gurus offer their secrets for toning and tightening the tummy. Like the quest for the Holy Grail, most of us are always on a mission to improve our abs. For a while, people coveted the washboard abs gracing runways, the pages of fashion magazines, and billboards in Times Square. Now everyone is after Beyonce's flat, tight stomach. So what does it take to get there? WebMD talked to fitness experts Ellen Barrett and Liz Neporent to find out the best way to achieve great abs and a tighter midsection. Here are their top six tips. Flat Ab Tip No. 1: Improve Your Posture Poor posture is a huge issue for many people, says celebrity trainer and star of numerous exercise DVDs Ellen ...
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10 Free and Low Cost Dental Care Options for Seniors
Dental Care
If you read our article, "The Importance of Senior Dental Care", you’ll know how important good oral health is to your overall quality of life. You’ll be able to chew food properly and without pain. You’ll taste what you’re chewing. You’ll reduce the likelihood of developing other health issues. And you’ll save money in the long run. But access to regular dental care is often difficult for seniors. Medicare doesn’t cover it. Medicaid coverage is limited. Out-of-pocket expenses can be prohibitive to those on a fixed income. Fortunately, there are organizations that can help. Here are 10 free or low cost dental care options for seniors: 1) The first place you should start is the toothwisdom...
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Doctors Train to Spot Signs of A.D.H.D. in Children
ADD/ADHD
Jerry, 9 years old, dissolved into his Game Boy while his father described his attentional difficulties to the family pediatrician. The child began flitting around the room distractedly, ignoring the doctor’s questions and squirming in his chair — but then he leapt up and yelled: “Freeze! What do you think is the problem here?” Nine-year-old Jerry was in fact being played by Dr. Peter Jensen, one of the nation’s most prominent child psychiatrists. On this Sunday in January in New York, Dr. Jensen was on a cross-country tour, teaching pediatricians and other medical providers how to properly evaluate children’s mental health issues — especially attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, which...
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Child Safety Products and Information
Baby-Proofing
Childproofing your home can seem like a formidable task at times, but when you consider some of the statistics regarding child injuries in the home, you begin to realize that even the smallest prevention measures go a long way. Now is always the time to get started, whether you have a baby already or if one is on the way. Time passes so quickly, and before you know it, your baby will be rolling, crawling and walking his way into everything. If you’re short on time, consider hiring a professional childproofer versus doing it yourself. Often these professionals can accomplish in a couple of hours what would take you days to complete. If you plan on doing it yourself, consider the following h...
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What Women Doctors Know About Skincare (That You Should, Too)
Beauty
Four women who have unlimited access to top dermatologists and plastic surgeons (because they are top dermatologists and plastic surgeons) share their expertise. Find out what they're doing for their own skin, what they wish they had done, what's way too risky for them, which products they swear by, which much-touted treatment is expensive baloney (they don't all agree). A report from the cutting (and jabbing and zapping) edge of skincare. What she's doing to her skin right now:"I do Botox every few months in my forehead, but not too often. I don't have a lot of deep lines, and I don't want to get rid of all my fine lines, but Botox gives me a brow lift effect. And I think it has prevented...
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15 Cancer Symptoms Men Ignore
Cancer
Men, heed these possible clues and find cancer early, when it's more treatable. Experts say that men could benefit greatly by being alert to certain cancer symptoms that require a trip to the doctor’s office sooner rather than later. But when it comes to scheduling doctor visits, men are notorious foot-draggers.  Leonard Lichtenfeld, MD, is deputy chief medical officer for the national office of the American Cancer Society. According to Lichtenfeld, men often need to be pushed by women to get screened for cancer. That’s unfortunate. Routine preventive care can find cancer and other diseases in their early stages. When cancer is found early, there are more options for treatment. That m...
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10 Ways to Keep Testosterone Levels High
Low Testesterone
Testosterone levels are plummeting. Studies have shown the average man's testosterone in today's society is nearly 25 per cent lower than in the 1980s. Without adequate testosterone, men become infertile, impotent, docile and weak. In fact, men with low testosterone are 52.4 per cent more likely to be obese; 50 per cent more likely develop diabetes; 42.4 per cent more likely to have high blood pressure and 40.4 per cent more likely to have high cholesterol. Why is the average man's testosterone lower than our ancestors and what can be done about it?   BPA BPA may be the biggest culprit to the declining levels of testosterone. BPA is Bisphenol-A, a synthetic chemical of...
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The Terrible Twos: A Myth?
Terrible Two’s (and 3’s)
We've all heard it…and we can all forget it. Age 2 can be tough—or terrific. Same goes for 1, 3, and 4. Two-year-olds get all the buzz, but the truth is, tantrums and mayhem can strike at any age, for a variety of reasons. “Most toddlers begin testing limits shortly after their first birthday and continue until about age four,” says Ari Brown, M.D., author of Toddler 411. So how did the Terrible Twos become such a pop-parenting phenomenon? “It's an old-fashioned idea and not supported by research,” says Alan Kazdin, Ph.D., director of the Parenting Center at Yale University. The term was coined in the 1950s, perhaps because so much pressure was put on families to be detergent-commercial pe...
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Teething: What you need to know
Teething
When will my baby start getting teeth? The vast majority of babies sprout their first teeth when they're between 4 and 7 months of age. An early developer may get his first white cap as early as 3 months, while a late bloomer may have to wait until he's a year old or more. (In rare cases, a baby's first tooth is already visible at birth.) Whenever the first tooth makes its appearance, celebrate the milestone by taking pictures and noting the date in your child's baby book. Teeth actually start developing while your baby's in the womb, when tooth buds form in the gums. Teeth break through one at a time over a period of months, and often — but not always — in this order: First the bottom two...
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6 Serious Symptoms in Babies Never to Ignore
Symptom Checker
Find out what to do if your baby shows these symptoms. Becoming a parent for the first time is amazing, but it can also be scary -- especially the first time your baby gets sick.  It can be tempting to hit the panic button for every little cough or rash. How can you tell what's serious, what's just new parent jitters, and what can wait until your baby’s next checkup? Here are six serious symptoms in babies that you should never ignore. 1. Blue lips (cyanosis) “If your baby’s lips are turning blue, or the mucus membranes in their mouth or tongue turn blue, this is a sign that they are not getting enough oxygen,” says Carrie Drazba, MD, a pediatrician at Rush University Medical ...
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Sudden Infant Death Syndrome: What you need to know
SIDS
Reducing the Risk A lack of answers is part of what makes sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) so frightening. SIDS is the leading cause of death among infants 1 month to 1 year old, and claims the lives of about 2,500 each year in the United States. It remains unpredictable despite years of research. Even so, the risk of SIDS can be greatly reduced. First and foremost, infants younger than 1 year old should be placed on their backs to sleep — never face-down on their stomachs. Searching for Answers As the name implies, SIDS is the sudden and unexplained death of an infant who is younger than 1 year old. It's a frightening prospect because it can strike without warning, usually in seeming...
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4 Most Important Baby Routines
Routines
Four key areas where establishing habits is particularly important to foster parent-child bonding for babies, and strategies for sticking to these routines. Babies are creatures of habit -- and that's a good thing. Predictable routines make life easier for everyone, and help forge parent-child bonds, says Karen Ruskin, Psy.D., author of The 9 Key Techniques for Raising Respectful Children Who Make Responsible Choices. "Babies develop a sense of safety and trust when they have good, solid routines," she says. "They know what's going to happen next, and that helps them thrive." Those feelings of love and security will stick with your child for years to come, say the experts. Take a look at fo...
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Parenting Styles & Infant Attachment
Parenting Styles
In the first few years of life, infants and children often heavily favor the company of their parents. The attachment bond responsible for this behavior is an emotional connection that helps your infant trust you, which eventually aids in relationship development later in life. The degree to which your infant attaches to you depends on your parenting style. Authoritative Parenting and Secure Attachment Diana Baumrind, clinical and developmental psychologist, outlined three parenting styles, the most optimal being the authoritative parenting style. This style is characterized by a balanced mixture of high control and parental warmth, which produces children who feel secure and have posi...
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Age-by-age guide to feeding your baby
Nutrition & Exercise
Use this guide to find out what and how much to feed your child in the first year. The amounts are meant as rough guidelines only, so don't worry if your little one eats a bit more or less than shown. It's a good idea to discuss your solid feeding plan with your child’s doctor before getting started. You don't have to introduce foods to your child in any special order. If you want to give your baby a taste of tofu at age 6 months, go ahead, even though it's not listed on our chart until age 8 months. And while cereal is a traditional first food in the United States, it's just fine to start with mashed fruits or vegetables instead. In most cases, you won't have to wait to introduce highly a...
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9 First Baby Milestones
Milestones
The 9 major physical baby milestones, signs of developmental delays, and what you can expect along the way. It's a thrill for parents to witness a baby milestone, whether it be the first time their baby smiles, grabs, or rolls over. But what are these milestones and when do babies reach them? And how can you tell if your child is just a late bloomer or is actually delayed? Read on. The 9 major physical milestones Smiling (8 weeks)Your baby has an adorable grin, but your husband says, "That's just gas." Is he right? It depends on how old your little grinner is. An infant can't produce what's called a social smile until about 8 weeks. It takes that long for his nervous system and vision to...
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How to Bathe Your Newborn
Grooming
Bath-time Essentials Bathing your newborn can seem incredibly daunting. They look so small and vulnerable naked, and can be so slippery and seemingly impossible to get into the tub. Before placing your newborn in the tub, you’ll want to make sure everything is ready for washing, playing, and drying.   You’ll need: A baby bath tub with a sling or mat to prevent the newborn from being immersed in water (not necessary for sponge bathing, but useful). There are infant tubs which support little heads and necks (like the Washpod, which purportedly mimics the womb experience) or bath positioners you can use in your tub. Before your baby’s umbilical cord stump falls off, you won’t be subm...
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Doctor Visits for Your Baby's First Year
Doctor Visits
The 1-month checkup What the doctor will do Weigh and measure your baby You'll need to undress your baby completely for weighing. The doctor weighs your baby, measures length and head circumference, and plots the numbers on a growth chart. The chart enables you to see how your baby compares with other children the same age. But it doesn't matter whether he's in the 5th or the 95th percentile, as long as his rate of growth is steady from one visit to the next. Do a complete physical Heart and lungs: Uses a stethoscope to listen for any abnormal heart rhythms or breathing problems. Eyes: Checks for signs of congenital eye conditions and other problems. May also check for blo...
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Breastfeeding: Getting started
Breastfeeding vs Bottle
How to start breastfeeding The first time you hold your newborn in the delivery room is a great time to start breastfeeding. At the beginning, your body will produce small amounts of a special milk called colostrum that will help protect your baby from infection. (Your baby's tummy is very tiny, so she only needs these small amounts to fill up. As her tummy grows, your milk will change and you'll produce more of it.) Turn your baby's whole body toward you, chest to chest. Touch her upper lip with your nipple, and, when she opens her mouth wide, pull her onto your breast, holding your breast for support. Her mouth should cover not just the nipple but as much of the areola (the darker part s...
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